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Thursday, May 7, 2020 | History

2 edition of Monitoring pesticide resistance in Psylla pyricola Foerster from western Oregon pear orchards found in the catalog.

Monitoring pesticide resistance in Psylla pyricola Foerster from western Oregon pear orchards

Peter A. Follett

Monitoring pesticide resistance in Psylla pyricola Foerster from western Oregon pear orchards

by Peter A. Follett

  • 357 Want to read
  • 13 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Pesticide resistance.,
  • Psylla.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Peter A. Follett.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination[11], 64 leaves, bound :
    Number of Pages64
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL14265526M

    Studies to assess the impact of reduced-risk insecticides, applied against C. pomonella, on the abundance of key natural enemies and secondary pests found in pear and walnut orchards were conducted during – Pear orchards were located in Hood River, OR while the walnut sites were located in Hamilton City, by: Phenology of Brown Marmorated Stink Bugs and Distribution near California Pear Orchards Chuck Ingels1, Lucia Varela2, Rachel Elkins3, and Cort Hurley1 1UC Cooperative Extension, Sacramento County 2UC Cooperative Extension, North Coast 3UC Cooperative Extension, Lake & Mendocino Counties (Funding provided by the Pear Pest Management Research Fund).

    University, Hood River, Oregon. Predicting and managing gray mold rot of pear in Oregon Robert A. Spotts and Steve Castagnoli EM • January G ray mold, one of the most serious decay problems for pear fruit in the Pacific Northwest, is estimated to cause about $6 million in losses to the pear industry each year due to fruit rot in. If 4 or more top flower clusters are infested, treat according to the Pear Pest Management Guidelines. If less than 4 top flower clusters are infested, resample in a week. Western boxelder bug: Spot treatments may be adequate in orchards near riparian areas; treat according to .

      Over the past seven seasons we have been testing the use of various methods to monitor and trap brown marmorated stink bug in Hudson Valley orchards and vegetable crops. This began with the use of black light traps, transitioning to the use of semiochemicals used in Tedders traps, sticky traps and most recently netted attract and kill stations. Sample costs to produce organic pears in the Sacramento Valley – Sacramento County are presented in this study. Pear orchards may have some trees over years old still producing a commercial crop. The life of the orchard at the time of planting in this study .


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Monitoring pesticide resistance in Psylla pyricola Foerster from western Oregon pear orchards by Peter A. Follett Download PDF EPUB FB2

Pear psylla, Cacopsylla pyricola (Foerster) (Homoptera: Psyllidae), is one of the key insect pests in North American pear production. In some growing areas, more than 50% of dollars spent to control arthropod pests in commercial pear are directed specifically at controlling this species. Control measures require accurate and timely information about dispersal, onset of egg-laying in spring Cited by: This thesis addressed the potential of endemic predaceous and parasitic arthropods of the Hood River Valley, Oregon to suppress the pear psylla, Cacopsylla pyricola F8rster.

Natural enemies adequately suppressed psylla in three of seven unsprayed orchards of Cited by: 3. Fenvalerate resistance was monitored in Psylla pyricola Foerster populations at 51 sites in Washington, Oregon, California, and British Columbia during early peach, pear, and cherry.

Cacopsylla pyricola. Pest description and crop damage Pear psylla is one of the major pear pests in commercial orchards. The adult resembles a miniature cicada. Adults have two distinct forms, a summer and winter form, which differ in appearance.

Inall pest species present except pear psylla, Psylla pyricola Foerster, were held below damaging densities by both soft and standard programs or by predators and parasites that survived. View Print Version. by Louis Nottingham and Betsy Beers, Septem Pear Psylla, Cacopsylla pyricola (Förster) (Figure 1), is probably the most challenging insect pest to Washington pear feed on leaves and excrete a liquid known as “honeydew”, consisting mostly of water and sugar (Figures 1 & 2).

Abstract. The synthetic pyrethroid permethrin sprayed at rates ranging from 2–6 g AI/ liters gave commercial control of the codling moth, Laspeyresia pomonella (L.) on pears. Permethrin and fenvalerate were somewhat acaricidal in their effects, particularly at high dosages (18 g AI/ liters) but these effects were of short by: Pear Psylla.

Scientific name: Cacopsylla pyricola. Phenology models predict timing of events in an organism's development. For many organisms which cannot internally regulate their own temperature, development is dependent on temperatures to which they are exposed in the environment.

Information in this database comes from published articles. appeared in summarized form in other publications, particularly "Pear Decline Investigations in Oregon", Annual Report, Oregon State Horticultural Society,and "Historical Facts Pertaining to Root- and frunkstocks for Pear Trees", Oregon Agricultural Experiment Station, Miscellaneous Paper pear orchards.

Key words: Cacopsylla pyri, pear psylla, resistance, antiresistant strategies INTRODUCTION Psyllids are among the most serious pests in pear orchards, which have been intensively treated with pesticides.

The species, which causes the most damage in central Europe, is Cacopsylla pyri. In the Czech Republic, C. pyri has caused. Pear psylla. Pear psylla, Cacopsylla pyricola (Foerster), are sucking insects that can cause damage to ornamental and edible varieties of pears.

For more information and images of pear psylla, check the following links: UC IPM Online: Pear psylla This site is one of the most comprehensive on this insect pest. Extensive research by U.C.

entomologists, in both greenhouse and field test plots, on the relation of insects to the cause or spread of pear decline disease indicates that the pear psylla, Psylla pyricola Foerster, is the key to the problem.

Bioassay 2: Pear psylla young and old nymph Introduction. These bioassays were conducted to test various products against pear psylla nymphs. They are part of a series of experiments evaluating product efficacies against each life stage of pear psylla. Pear psylla, Cacopsylla pyricola (Foerster) (Hemiptera: Psyllidae), is one of the most important insect pests of pears (Pyrus sp.

(Rosaceae)) in Washington, Oregon and other pear-growing states in the USA. If not properly managed, pear psylla can rapidly build up and damage both fruits and trees [].Outbreak levels of pear psylla often result in downgraded fruit and/or increased harvest and Cited by: 3.

Developing a Philosophy and Program of Pesticide Resistance Management. and H. Riedl. Local and regional resistance to fenvalerate in Psylla pyricola Foerster (Homoptera: Psyllidae) in western North America. Can. and P. Westigard. Regional resistance to insecticides in Psylla pyricola from pear orchards in Oregon.

Can Cited by: Begin sampling for adults in the dormant phase when daytime temperatures reach at least 45 F, beginning around early March, and continue weekly through : Usu Extension.

African Entomology, 11(1) Pringle, K.L. & Heunis, J.M. The Development of a Sampling System for Monitoring Population Levels of the Woolly Apple Aphid, Eriosoma Lanigerum (Hausmann), in Apple Orchards in the Western Cape Province of South Africa.

African Entomology, 16(1) Stenekamp, D. Project Methods 1. Development and evaluation of new postharvest decay management methods in pear: a. Fungicides (pre- and postharvest), stimulants of fruit decay resistance, biocontrol agents, and storage atmospheres will be evaluated in replicated, inoculated trials to.

Young Bartlett, Winter Nelis, and Hardy pear Pyrus communis L. trees with six different rootstocks were studied during through Non-topgrafted trees of each type of rootstock were included.

Three treatments were used: (1) saran cages placed around entire trees (caged-control); (2) spray applications (exposed-control); and (3) psylla infestation with Psylla pyricola Foerster confined.

Pear psylla Type of Pest: Insect Frequency of Occurrence: Pear Psylla is the primary pear pest in North America. The psylla has spread to all the pear growing areas of the United States and Canada. Damage Caused: Honeydew injury occurs when excess honeydew drips onto and congregates on lower leaves and fruit.

Under bright sunlight and dry. Cacopsylla pyricola (Foerster) (pear psylla) (Hemiptera: Psyllidae), a significant pest of pears, is the primary prey for D. brevis in pear orchards. This mirid predator and other arthropod natural enemies found in pear orchard systems can be adversely affected by some of the insecticides used to control pest arthropods in these orchards.Orchards Children’s Services mourns the passing of Doris Lee (Rothberg) Goldman.

Doris, cherished widow of the late Irving E. Goldman, is survived by her daughters Carol Klein and Meg Kasdan, their husbands Mitchell Klein and Lawrence Kasdan, as well as four grandchildren, Jake Kasdan and his wife Inara George, Jonathan Kasdan, Jackson Klein and his fiancee Dara Bernstein, and Natalie Klein.The ability to estimate natural enemy abundance is crucial to the integration of biological control into IPM programs.

Traditional sampling approaches for natural enemies are few and most are inefficient, but recent studies suggest attraction of natural enemies to plant volatiles may Cited by: